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My World of Coffee

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French Press

Make sure your plunger and the beaker are clean. Rinse them with hot water, and use soap if needed. Coffee sediments will impart a bad taste to your coffee.
Fill the pot with hot water before brewing; it will help to maintain the brewing temperature during steeping. It will also prevent thermal shock and keep your coffee hot a little longer.
In the meantime, grind your favorite coffee beans with a good quality burr grinder. The grind size should be coarse for a clear cup.

Dump the hot water and put three tablespoons of the ground coffee into the bottom of your beaker.
Pour hot, water, (194-200 °F) into the glass pot. Add just a quarter of the final volume, and stir the water and coffee with a wooden spoon or spatula. Metal spoons can break you glass because of the thermal shock.
Pour the rest of the water and stir again.

Place the plunger on top of the pot and lower it just enough to make contact with the water.
Make sure to turn the lid covers the mouth of the French press to maintain the water temperature.
Wrap the pot with a towel to add insulation; it helps to maintain the coffee hot.
Let the coffee steep for about 4 minutes.
Push the plunger down slowly, all the way to the bottom of the beaker.
Lift the lid to open the spout, and pour.

NOTE: We recommends using 40 grams of ground coffee for every 400 grams of water. This ratio is what they call 1:10 coffee to water ratio. It’s a little inconvenient to measure it that way if you ask me. But this comes around 3 tablespoons of ground coffee to 2 cups. So, this means they like their coffee stronger.
You can play with the coffee to water ratio when brewing with a French press, altering other factors. For instance, if you grind finer, you can use fewer grounds. Water temperature plays a big role here, the hotter the water, the less grounds you need. But with very hot water the brew tends to migrate on the bitter side, being over-extracted.

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